Nigerian legal system

LPI201
SESAN FABAMISE

Course description

Description

 

Classroom: As indicated on the time-table

 

Instructors Office:  College of Law, ABUAD Building          

 

 

 

1. PREREQUISITES

 

General entry requirements for the program

 

2. GENERAL REQUIRED TEXT AND READINGS

 

TextBooks

 

  1. Asein, J.O. (2005). ‘Introduction to the Nigerian Legal System’.

  2. Ogbu, O.N. (2002). ‘Modern Nigerian Legal System’. CIDJAP press, Enugu, Nigeria.

  3. Ese Malemi (2009). ‘The Nigerian Legal System’. 3rd ed. Princeton Publishing Co.

  4. Agbede Oluwole. I. (1991) ‘Legal Pluralism’ Shaneson C.I. Ltd. Ibadan

  5. Niki Tobi. ‘Sources of Nigerian Law’ MIJ Publishers Ltd. Lagos

  6. 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (as amended)

     

    Articles

 

  • Abdulqadir Ibrahim Abikan. (2002) The Application of Islamic Law in Civil Causes in Nigerian Courts. Journal of International and Comparative Law. Vol 6. 88-115. available at unilorin.edu.ng/publications/abikan

  • Shehu, Ajepe. T. (2010) Oversight Powers of the Legislature: Scope and Limitations under the 1999 Nigerian Constitution. Journal of Public Law and Constitutional Practice. Vol 3 No 1. 69-91

  • Peter A. Anyebe. (2010) Judicial Review of the legislative and Executive Acts in Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Law, Practice and Procedure of Legislature. Vol 2, No 1. 64-98

 

 

 

 3. COURSE DESCRIPTION: An in-depth study of the intricacies of the legal system in Nigeria.

 

 

 

4. POLICIES ON CLASS ATTENDANCE AND PARTICPATION

 

Regular and punctual attendance at every class session is a requirement of all degree programs at ABUAD. Participation in class discussions is an important part of the learning experience for all students as well as a factor in grading. If illness or another unusual circumstance requires missing a class, please do your best to inform the instructors.

 

 

 

5. GRADING

 

The final grade is based on Continuous Assessment which shall consist of Group Presentation (10%), Test (10%), Assignment (individual) (10%), Class Attendance (10%) and a written final exam (60%). The final examination is a three hour closed book in-class examination, with problem and essay type questions, including hypothetical cases.

 

 

 

6. COURSE CONTENTS

 

 

 

WEEK ONE:

 

 

 

WEEK TWO:

 

 

 

WEEK THREE: Sources of Nigerian Law: Legislation

 

Outcome: At the end of the third week, students should be able to:

 

  • Explain the term legislation

  • Identify the various legislations present in Nigeria and their meaning

  • Understand the difference between primary and secondary legislation

  • Explain the legislative process

 

      Methodology:

 

In a class of 1hour 30 minutes, a period of 1hour shall be dedicated to teaching. The     remaining 30 minutes shall be divided into two parts of 15(fifteen) minutes each. This will be used for interaction on the course content and class discussion respectively. Class interaction shall take the form of general discussions, scenarios, class debates and seminars as well as presentations. The class shall be divided into groups for each topic and each group is expected to have a mini presentation on each topic.

 

Resources:

 

  • INEC V Musa [2003] 10 W.R.N. 1

  • Attorney General Bendel State v Attorney General of the Federation (1981) 10 S.C. 1

  • People’s Democratic Party v I.N.E.C [2001] 1 W.R.N. 1

  • Barclays Bank of Nigeria v Ashiru [1978] 6-7 S.C. 99.

  • Trade Bank Plc v Lagos Island Local Government Council [2003] 3 NWLR (pt 806) 11 at 27

  • A.G Bendel State v A.G. Federation and 22 others. [1981] 1 ALL NLR 85

  • Okafor v Okonkwo [2002] 17 NWLR (pt 796] 262 at 291.

  • Brown v Board of Education[1954] 347 US 483

  • Oseni v Dawodu [1994] 4 N.W.L.R 390.

  • Lakanmi v Attorney General of Western State [1971] 1 U.I.L.R 21

 

Evaluation:

 

  1. With the aid of case law, define legislation and the importance of legislation in the Nigerian legal system

  2. Explain the legislative process under the constitution

  3. Discuss subsidiary legislations and its limitations

 

 

 

WEEK FOUR: Judicial Precedent

 

Outcome: At the end of week four, students must be able to;

 

  • Explain the term ‘Judicial Precedents’ and its nature

  • Discuss the various precedents and their application

  • Explain the operation of judicial precedents in Nigerian courts

  • Understand the concept of ‘Per Incuriam’, ‘Res Judicata’ and ‘Obiter Dicta’

 

Methodology: Teaching,active class participation, discussions and assignment.

 

Resources:

 

  • Abu v Adegbo [2001] 41 W.R.N. 1

  • Taiwo v Akinwunmi [1975] 4 SC 143

  • National Electric Power Authority v Onah [1997] 1 N.W.L.R 680

  • Bello v Udoye [2004] 19 W.R.N. 58 at 79-80

  • Nash v Tamplin and sons Brewery, Bighton Ltd

  • ECU-Line N.V. V Adelekan [2001] 1 NWLR (pt 721) 261 at 282

  • Chairman L.E.D.B V Olopinkwu [1959] 4 F.S.C 53

  • Okpala v Okpu [2003] 13 W.R.N. 1 (S.C)

  • Huddersfield Police Authority v Watson [1974] 2 ALL E.R. 193

  • Attorney General of Ogun State v Egenti [1986] 3 NWLR. 256

  • Mba v Ibe [1999] 4 NWLR (pt 597) 97

  • Enugwu v Okefi [2000] 3 NWLR (pt 650) 620

  • Nwangwu v Nwangwu [2000] 6 NWLR (pt 598) 298 at 310

  • Mobil Oil (Nig). Plc v IAL 36 Inc.[2000] 6 NWLR (pt 659) 146

  • Nigerian Railway Corporation Pensions Fund [1970] 1 ALL NLR 281

  • Ege Shipping Industries v Trigris International Corporation [1999] 14 NWLR pt 637. 70

  • Eliochin (Nig) ltd v Mbadiwe [1986] 1 N.W.L.R.

  • Johnson v Lawanson [1971] 1 N.M.L.R 380

  • Bucknor-Maclean v Inlaks Ltd [1980] 8-11 S.C. 1

  • Owunmi v P.Z.(Nig) Ltd. 1974] 1 ALL NLR (pt 2) 107

  • Sanni v Ademiuyi [2003] 3 NWLR (pt 807) 381 at 402-404

  • Emesin v Nwachikwu[1999] 10 NWLR (pt 621) 167 at 171-172,

  • Unongo v Aku [1983] 2 SCNLR 332

  • Dalhatu v Turaki[2003] 42 W.R.N 15

  • Emodi v Commissioner of lands [1972] 2 E.C.S.L.R 47 at 49

  • Araka v Egbue [2003] 33 W.R.N. 1

  • The queen v Governor of Eastern Nigeria, Ex Parte Warri [1960] 4 E.N.L.R 98

  • Board of Customs and Excise v Bolarinwa [1968] M.N.L.R. 350 at 352,

 

 

 

Evaluation:

 

1. Discuss the operation of Judicial Precedents in Nigerian Courts

 

2. Discuss the following concepts; ‘Per Incuriam’, ‘Res Judicata’ and ‘Obiter Dicta’

 

 

 

WEEK FIVE: Customary Law

 

Outcome: At the end of this lesson, students should be able to

 

  • Define customs and customary Law

  • Explain the characteristics of customary Law

  • Identify how customary law can be ascertained

  • Understand the criteria for the validity of customary Law

  • Understand the statutory requirements laid down for the applicability of customary Law

     

    Methodology: Lectures, class discussions, presentations

     

    Resources:

 

  • Lewis v Bankole [1908] 1 NLR 81 at 83

  • Ojisua v Ayebelehin [2001] 11 NWLR (PT 723) 44 at 52

  • Owoniyi v Omotosho [ 1961] 1 Al NLR 304

  • Zaidan v Mobosen [1973] 11 FSC 1

  • Owoniyi v Omotosho [1961] 1 ALL NLR 304

  • Kimdey v Military Governor of Gongola State and Ors, [1988] 2 NWLR Pt 77,P 445 at 461

  • Osamwoyin v Osamwoyin [1972] All NLR 792 at 799

  • Esugbayi Eleko v The officer Administering the Government of Nigeria. [1931] AC 662 at p 673

  • Kimdey v Military Governor of Gongola State[1988] 2 NWLR pt 77 p 445 at 461

  • Agbai v Okogbue [1991] 7 N.W.L.R 391

  • Oloto v Dawuda [1904] 1 N.L.R. 58

  • Amodu Tijani v Secretary of Southern Nigeria [1921] 2 AC 399 at 404

  • Oshodi v Balogun [1936] 2 ALL E.R 1632.

  • Re Estate of Agboruja [1949] 19 NLR 38

  • Egba Native Administration v Adeyanju [1936] 13 NLR 77, R v Lt Governor of Eastern Region [1957] 2 FSC 46

  • Laoye v Oyetunde [1944] A.C. 170

  • Edet v Esien[1932] 11 N.L.R. 47

  • Danmole v Dawodu [1958] 3 F.S.C.46

  • Effiong Okon Ata [1930] 10 N.L.R. 65

  • Mojekwu v Mojekwu [1997] 7 N.W.L.R 283

  • Agidigbi v Agidigbi [1992] 2 N.W.L.R pt 221, p 98

  • Re Adadevoh[1951] 13 WACA 304

  • Rotibi v Savage[1944] 17 NLR 77

  • Adesubokan v Yinusa[1971] N.N.L.R. 77

  • Uke v Iro [2001] 17 W.R.N 172(C.A)

  • Malomo v Olushola[1954] 21 N.L.R 1

  • Mojekwu v Mojekwu[1997] 7 NWLR pt 512, p 283

     

    Evaluation:

    1. With the aid of decided cases, discuss how customary law is ascertained

    2. For any rule of customary law to be valid, it must satisfy three criteria. Explain.

    3. What are the merits and demerits of Judicial precedents?

     

     

    WEEK SIX: Islamic Law

     

    Outcome: At the end of the week students must be able to:

 

  • Discuss Islamic law as a source of Nigerian Law

  • Evaluate the origin and spread of Islam and Islamic Law

  • Discuss the sources of Islamic Law

  • Application of Islamic Law In Nigerian Courts

     

    Methodology: Lectures, class discussions, presentations

 

Resources:

 

  • Abubakar Faransi v Habsatu Noma [2007] 10 N.W.L.R pt 104 203

 

 

 

WEEK SEVEN

 

WEEK EIGHT

 

WEEK NINE:

 

Mid Semester Test

 

WEEKS TEN TO TWELVE

 

Revision

Classroom: As indicated on the time-table

Instructors Office:  College of Law, ABUAD Building          

 

1. PREREQUISITES

General entry requirements for the program

2. GENERAL REQUIRED TEXT AND READINGS

TextBooks

  1. Asein, J.O. (2005). ‘Introduction to the Nigerian Legal System’.

  2. Ogbu, O.N. (2002). ‘Modern Nigerian Legal System’. CIDJAP press, Enugu, Nigeria.

  3. Ese Malemi (2009). ‘The Nigerian Legal System’. 3rd ed. Princeton Publishing Co.

  4. Agbede Oluwole. I. (1991) ‘Legal Pluralism’ Shaneson C.I. Ltd. Ibadan

  5. Niki Tobi. ‘Sources of Nigerian Law’ MIJ Publishers Ltd. Lagos

  6. 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (as amended)

     

    Articles

  • Abdulqadir Ibrahim Abikan. (2002) The Application of Islamic Law in Civil Causes in Nigerian Courts. Journal of International and Comparative Law. Vol 6. 88-115. available at unilorin.edu.ng/publications/abikan

  • Shehu, Ajepe. T. (2010) Oversight Powers of the Legislature: Scope and Limitations under the 1999 Nigerian Constitution. Journal of Public Law and Constitutional Practice. Vol 3 No 1. 69-91

  • Peter A. Anyebe. (2010) Judicial Review of the legislative and Executive Acts in Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Law, Practice and Procedure of Legislature. Vol 2, No 1. 64-98

 

 3. COURSE DESCRIPTION: An in-depth study of the intricacies of the legal system in Nigeria.

 

4. POLICIES ON CLASS ATTENDANCE AND PARTICPATION

Regular and punctual attendance at every class session is a requirement of all degree programs at ABUAD. Participation in class discussions is an important part of the learning experience for all students as well as a factor in grading. If illness or another unusual circumstance requires missing a class, please do your best to inform the instructors.

 

5. GRADING

The final grade is based on Continuous Assessment which shall consist of Group Presentation (10%), Test (10%), Assignment (individual) (10%), Class Attendance (10%) and a written final exam (60%). The final examination is a three hour closed book in-class examination, with problem and essay type questions, including hypothetical cases.

 

6. COURSE CONTENTS

 

WEEK ONE:

 

WEEK TWO:

 

WEEK THREE: Sources of Nigerian Law: Legislation

Outcome: At the end of the third week, students should be able to:

  • Explain the term legislation

  • Identify the various legislations present in Nigeria and their meaning

  • Understand the difference between primary and secondary legislation

  • Explain the legislative process

      Methodology:

In a class of 1hour 30 minutes, a period of 1hour shall be dedicated to teaching. The     remaining 30 minutes shall be divided into two parts of 15(fifteen) minutes each. This will be used for interaction on the course content and class discussion respectively. Class interaction shall take the form of general discussions, scenarios, class debates and seminars as well as presentations. The class shall be divided into groups for each topic and each group is expected to have a mini presentation on each topic.

Resources:

  • INEC V Musa [2003] 10 W.R.N. 1

  • Attorney General Bendel State v Attorney General of the Federation (1981) 10 S.C. 1

  • People’s Democratic Party v I.N.E.C [2001] 1 W.R.N. 1

  • Barclays Bank of Nigeria v Ashiru [1978] 6-7 S.C. 99.

  • Trade Bank Plc v Lagos Island Local Government Council [2003] 3 NWLR (pt 806) 11 at 27

  • A.G Bendel State v A.G. Federation and 22 others. [1981] 1 ALL NLR 85

  • Okafor v Okonkwo [2002] 17 NWLR (pt 796] 262 at 291.

  • Brown v Board of Education[1954] 347 US 483

  • Oseni v Dawodu [1994] 4 N.W.L.R 390.

  • Lakanmi v Attorney General of Western State [1971] 1 U.I.L.R 21

Evaluation:

  1. With the aid of case law, define legislation and the importance of legislation in the Nigerian legal system

  2. Explain the legislative process under the constitution

  3. Discuss subsidiary legislations and its limitations

 

WEEK FOUR: Judicial Precedent

Outcome: At the end of week four, students must be able to;

  • Explain the term ‘Judicial Precedents’ and its nature

  • Discuss the various precedents and their application

  • Explain the operation of judicial precedents in Nigerian courts

  • Understand the concept of ‘Per Incuriam’, ‘Res Judicata’ and ‘Obiter Dicta’

Methodology: Teaching,active class participation, discussions and assignment.

Resources:

  • Abu v Adegbo [2001] 41 W.R.N. 1

  • Taiwo v Akinwunmi [1975] 4 SC 143

  • National Electric Power Authority v Onah [1997] 1 N.W.L.R 680

  • Bello v Udoye [2004] 19 W.R.N. 58 at 79-80

  • Nash v Tamplin and sons Brewery, Bighton Ltd

  • ECU-Line N.V. V Adelekan [2001] 1 NWLR (pt 721) 261 at 282

  • Chairman L.E.D.B V Olopinkwu [1959] 4 F.S.C 53

  • Okpala v Okpu [2003] 13 W.R.N. 1 (S.C)

  • Huddersfield Police Authority v Watson [1974] 2 ALL E.R. 193

  • Attorney General of Ogun State v Egenti [1986] 3 NWLR. 256

  • Mba v Ibe [1999] 4 NWLR (pt 597) 97

  • Enugwu v Okefi [2000] 3 NWLR (pt 650) 620

  • Nwangwu v Nwangwu [2000] 6 NWLR (pt 598) 298 at 310

  • Mobil Oil (Nig). Plc v IAL 36 Inc.[2000] 6 NWLR (pt 659) 146

  • Nigerian Railway Corporation Pensions Fund [1970] 1 ALL NLR 281

  • Ege Shipping Industries v Trigris International Corporation [1999] 14 NWLR pt 637. 70

  • Eliochin (Nig) ltd v Mbadiwe [1986] 1 N.W.L.R.

  • Johnson v Lawanson [1971] 1 N.M.L.R 380

  • Bucknor-Maclean v Inlaks Ltd [1980] 8-11 S.C. 1

  • Owunmi v P.Z.(Nig) Ltd. 1974] 1 ALL NLR (pt 2) 107

  • Sanni v Ademiuyi [2003] 3 NWLR (pt 807) 381 at 402-404

  • Emesin v Nwachikwu[1999] 10 NWLR (pt 621) 167 at 171-172,

  • Unongo v Aku [1983] 2 SCNLR 332

  • Dalhatu v Turaki[2003] 42 W.R.N 15

  • Emodi v Commissioner of lands [1972] 2 E.C.S.L.R 47 at 49

  • Araka v Egbue [2003] 33 W.R.N. 1

  • The queen v Governor of Eastern Nigeria, Ex Parte Warri [1960] 4 E.N.L.R 98

  • Board of Customs and Excise v Bolarinwa [1968] M.N.L.R. 350 at 352,

 

Evaluation:

1. Discuss the operation of Judicial Precedents in Nigerian Courts

2. Discuss the following concepts; ‘Per Incuriam’, ‘Res Judicata’ and ‘Obiter Dicta’

 

WEEK FIVE: Customary Law

Outcome: At the end of this lesson, students should be able to

  • Define customs and customary Law

  • Explain the characteristics of customary Law

  • Identify how customary law can be ascertained

  • Understand the criteria for the validity of customary Law

  • Understand the statutory requirements laid down for the applicability of customary Law

     

    Methodology: Lectures, class discussions, presentations

     

    Resources:

  • Lewis v Bankole [1908] 1 NLR 81 at 83

  • Ojisua v Ayebelehin [2001] 11 NWLR (PT 723) 44 at 52

  • Owoniyi v Omotosho [ 1961] 1 Al NLR 304

  • Zaidan v Mobosen [1973] 11 FSC 1

  • Owoniyi v Omotosho [1961] 1 ALL NLR 304

  • Kimdey v Military Governor of Gongola State and Ors, [1988] 2 NWLR Pt 77,P 445 at 461

  • Osamwoyin v Osamwoyin [1972] All NLR 792 at 799

  • Esugbayi Eleko v The officer Administering the Government of Nigeria. [1931] AC 662 at p 673

  • Kimdey v Military Governor of Gongola State[1988] 2 NWLR pt 77 p 445 at 461

  • Agbai v Okogbue [1991] 7 N.W.L.R 391

  • Oloto v Dawuda [1904] 1 N.L.R. 58

  • Amodu Tijani v Secretary of Southern Nigeria [1921] 2 AC 399 at 404

  • Oshodi v Balogun [1936] 2 ALL E.R 1632.

  • Re Estate of Agboruja [1949] 19 NLR 38

  • Egba Native Administration v Adeyanju [1936] 13 NLR 77, R v Lt Governor of Eastern Region [1957] 2 FSC 46

  • Laoye v Oyetunde [1944] A.C. 170

  • Edet v Esien[1932] 11 N.L.R. 47

  • Danmole v Dawodu [1958] 3 F.S.C.46

  • Effiong Okon Ata [1930] 10 N.L.R. 65

  • Mojekwu v Mojekwu [1997] 7 N.W.L.R 283

  • Agidigbi v Agidigbi [1992] 2 N.W.L.R pt 221, p 98

  • Re Adadevoh[1951] 13 WACA 304

  • Rotibi v Savage[1944] 17 NLR 77

  • Adesubokan v Yinusa[1971] N.N.L.R. 77

  • Uke v Iro [2001] 17 W.R.N 172(C.A)

  • Malomo v Olushola[1954] 21 N.L.R 1

  • Mojekwu v Mojekwu[1997] 7 NWLR pt 512, p 283

     

    Evaluation:

    1. With the aid of decided cases, discuss how customary law is ascertained

    2. For any rule of customary law to be valid, it must satisfy three criteria. Explain.

    3. What are the merits and demerits of Judicial precedents?

     

     

    WEEK SIX: Islamic Law

     

    Outcome: At the end of the week students must be able to:

  • Discuss Islamic law as a source of Nigerian Law

  • Evaluate the origin and spread of Islam and Islamic Law

  • Discuss the sources of Islamic Law

  • Application of Islamic Law In Nigerian Courts

     

    Methodology: Lectures, class discussions, presentations

Resources:

  • Abubakar Faransi v Habsatu Noma [2007] 10 N.W.L.R pt 104 203

 

WEEK SEVEN

WEEK EIGHT

WEEK NINE:

Mid Semester Test

WEEKS TEN TO TWELVE

Revision


Manager(s) for LPI201 : SESAN FABAMISE
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